Now Playing Tracks

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown Dehua artist
A European family
China (late 1600s)
Porcelain
Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore
There’s an exhibition on in Singapore now called China Mania!: The Global Passion for Porcelain, 800-1900. It features porcelain works made by Chinese kilns for customers in Europe, the Middle East, India, Southeast Asia and Japan, including a fair number of representations of Europeans (plus one of Persians!).
This one comes from the kilns in the county of Dehua, in Fujian Province. Turns out there was a whole industry of manufacturing statuettes of people in Western dress for export.
For some reason, this artist seems to believe that the average European family owns not only a dog, but also - on the bottom right - a monkey.
Zoom Info
Camera
iPhone 5
ISO
160
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/20th
Focal Length
4mm

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown Dehua artist

A European family

China (late 1600s)

Porcelain

Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore

There’s an exhibition on in Singapore now called China Mania!: The Global Passion for Porcelain, 800-1900. It features porcelain works made by Chinese kilns for customers in Europe, the Middle East, India, Southeast Asia and Japan, including a fair number of representations of Europeans (plus one of Persians!).

This one comes from the kilns in the county of Dehua, in Fujian Province. Turns out there was a whole industry of manufacturing statuettes of people in Western dress for export.

For some reason, this artist seems to believe that the average European family owns not only a dog, but also - on the bottom right - a monkey.

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty

This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces.

Interesting notes

"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

allthingslinguistic:

feitclub:

It’s a katakana font (named “ゴウラ”) designed to look like Olde English fancy print

This must be the Japanese equivalent of that “asian” font you see on Chinese takeout boxes

(via a friend-of-a-friend on Facebook. hat-tip to artofemilyo)

The comments on the Language Log post about Gothic katakana are also interesting, including a link to The Structures of Letters and Symbols throughout Human History Are Selected to Match Those Found in Objects in Natural Scenes

A Wandering Botanist: Dye Plant--Sawwort, Serratula tinctoria, Obscure Historic Yellow Dye

I was starting to think that maybe I didn’t want these plants in that flower bed when I leafed through Dominque Cardon’s book  Natural Dyes and found sawwort listed in the historic yellow dyes. “Since the Middle Ages, sawwort has been used in several European textile centers…In Tuscany in the 14th and 15th centuries it was as highly valued as weld as a dye for dyeing woollen cloth yellow and green.” (p. 178)

We make Tumblr themes